Tuesday, November 19, 2013

Free WiFi at DFW

It’s 2013. Connectivity is king. And yet, many travelers have to deal with anemic Internet connection speeds when we travel, and that can be a significant impediment to what we do.

For example, the connectivity I enjoy in my in-home office is about 40 MBps. Because I work there every day, that has more or less become my “default standard.” Anything less when I’m on the road, and I notice it.

It’s especially noticeable in hotels, where it seems the average connection speed is 1 MBps, which is fine for e-mail but not so good when transmitting files, etc. As businesspeople know, that’s pretty much a part of what we do every day.

Accordingly, I’ve taken several hotels to task, especially when they charge a fee for what they call “high-speed Internet access” that is anything but high-speed.

It is therefore with great delight that I report the complimentary connectivity at two airports I’ve visited today is really quite good.

Starting out my trip at Seattle’s SeaTac Airport, I expected fairly slow connection speed because, after all, it was free. Imagine my surprise when I checked via www.speakeasy.net/speedtest and found the download speed a bit higher than 3 MPbs. Quite workable indeed.

As I write this, I’m sitting in a restaurant at DFW and connected via its fairly new offering of terminal-wide wireless access.  The last time I was through, the airport itself did not offer wireless connectivity; one needed to get it through an airline club or other provider. Now, it seems to be airport-wide.

Even better, the speed is great. Download speed was almost 8 MBps and upload speed almost 13 MBps.

Certainly, this will slow as more people discover this and log on, but kudos to DFW for joining the 21st century, even if they’re 13 years late to the party. Your travelers will thank you.

Visit my main page at TheTravelPro.us for more news, reviews, and personal observations on the world of upmarket travel.



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